© 2022



EXHIBITION       (NATURE IN) LOCKDOWN

DATE 04.06. 21 - 02.  07.21


ARCHIVES

CURATOR           YINGBI LEE, MARYAM ARSHAD











Cchiù Luntana Mme Staje
Cchiù Vicina Te Sento


BY EMERALD LIU










This collection of images are visual souvenirs of a home away from home, captivating the beautiful nature along the Amalfi coast, where the gardens create a sanctuary infused with the scents of lemon orchards and the Tyrrhenian Sea.
Cchiù luntana mme staje / The further away you are from me
Cchiù vicina te sento / The closer I feel you
(Passione, Roberto Murolo)

The lyrics from Neapolitan singer Roberto Murolo perfectly encapsulate the sensation that the Campanian countryside evokes.

The Amalfi coast breathes lemon scented sea air, it breathes memories along curved vistas, it breathes home.
Its beauty awes and comforts. The chaos carried within unfurls and echoes along its shoreline, offering a sense of familiarity, of friendship and eternity.
A region where Chinese values overlap with the Neapolitan soulful spirit against the backdrop of dazzling seascapes and cliffs.

Ancient sensuality meets intense vibrancy."






Mask (Phragmites Australis)


BY KRISTINA SHEUFELT










I created this piece during a time of mostly-unformed thoughts about the role of my body in natural environments, and vice versa. Ironically, while this piece was made several months before I'd heard of coronavirus or ever imagined a year of living under quarantine lockdown, I had first conceived of the mask as an exaggerated air-filtration device, an apparatus for breathing clean air. After the first time I put it on, however, it transformed, and I started thinking of it as a way to bring nature to the body when the body cannot be in nature.

Throughout the course of lockdown, I have found myself craving physical interactions with the natural in lieu of human touch and companionship, which has spurred the ideation of several additional wearable landscape objects.







Portals


BY BRENNA TUEL











Over the past year and continuing into the present, nature has become a portal for me. In this sense, it has become a significant means of escape from the challenges of everyday life - including strained relationships, the overwhelming feeling of being trapped and the inability to forecast a secure future. Whereas in the past I mostly enjoyed nature for the smells and sounds it provided, I now seek out dark shadows, illusions created by light and a sense of true discomfort and uncanniness- reflections that illuminate the struggles I have been facing. Nature has become comforting in the sense that it has seen me at my most vulnerable and continues to remind me that life is unpredictable. This series includes three portals: light, water, and darkness. Each is cradled within a hard surface - something intangible and ephemeral resting inside of something solid and tactile. These portals are comforting, but uncomfortable- a contrast that I encounter everyday and continue to try to metamorphose amidst.





Hidden Traces


BY HELEN BOOTH










I am an abstract painter whose ideas are firmly rooted in the landscape. This emotional response to what I see, I distil to create paintings that are meditative and strive to capture the Beauty that is inherent in Nature. I have always been drawn to colder climates, and last year just before Lockdown I was an artist in residence at the Hafnarborg Arts and Culture Centre in Iceland. Witnessing the majestic, haunting landscape has led to a whole new body of work. I felt so connected to the rhythm of nature whilst in residence.





Threshold


BY SARAH PEDLOW










My practice is a form of way-finding and map-making as an expat living in Amsterdam, NL. Looking for small poetic acts of care has been a nurturing practice during the lockdown. On my daily walks in the city, I photograph signs of nature, human interaction, and the passage of time on the walls, windows, and street. I am interested in the conversation between the hollyhock sprouting up out of a crack in the sidewalk and the neighbor who rigs up a cord to tie it against the building and guide it toward the sun. A braid of hay on the street reminds me of traditional cultures in another time and place where women cultivated hay while wearing braided hair and ribbons.

During the lockdown, I have been working on laser prints made at home. Imperfect images at letter scale speak to this surreal and precarious time. In my studio, I stitch, draw on and cut lines in the images, referencing textile floral patterns, the pleats of an apron, a lace collar, or a junction of leaves and branches. I curl the paper, peeling back the membrane from one realm to another, transgressing the photograph, creating a low-tech 3-D effect in today’s world of virtual reality and the bizarre reality of COVID.






Escape


BY MARYNA SHTANKO










A few years ago my parents bought a house in a small village in Ukraine. According to Wikipedia, it had a population of 47 people in 2001. I used to visit my parents once in a while and stay there over a weekend. It's a beautiful place but somehow I always felt as if I didn't belong there. Being used to city life and urban surroundings, I didn't feel comfortable while staying "in the middle of nowhere". In the whole village, there are only a couple of houses located close to a pine forest. There are no schools and no grocery stores.

However, this year everything's changed. Because of the lockdown, my two close friends and I spent several weeks at my parents' house. During the pandemic times, it appeared to be a perfect place to stay and thus escape reality. I wanted to capture this time and see how such an ordinary life can be at the same time so unusual. And how the addiction to the realities of the modern world can change a person's attitude towards nature and solitude.






Anthropocene


BY LAURA MYCHAL










These two works portray my feelings towards the negative changes happening to our natural world. COVID has shown us that we have been pushing against nature in such a way that it is is now pushing back on us. These two works look at how capitalistic ideals are endangering the natural world. The Anthropocene era signifies a time in our history where the manmade material outweighs the natural material and that really stuck with me. "When the Sky Breaks Open," uses capitalistic material to imagine the danger our society's activity wreaks on the earth, the atmosphere, and the landscape.





Blossoms Of An Oak Tree


BY ALICE GARIK










During lockdown, I took daily walks in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. The sensitivity I developed from walking on earth and climbing over tree toots opened this urban park as a refuge. More than this, I noticed for the first time how trees blossom in the spring.

Finding the blossoms of a large oak tree on the ground, knocked down after a windy rain storm, I was amazed by the delicacy of these newly sprouted blossoms and yellow green leaves.
I took these home with me, placed them directly in my enlarger and made camera-less 16X20 inch negatives. Transforming them gives me the ability to print them with a contact printing method. I brush a palladium solution onto paper that is also made from plants, Japanese gampi. I then expose the negatives using the sun.

I also combined them in a collage with other negatives. The work, Breathe, is made from printing multiple negatives in layers and painting with pearlescent watercolors. In this work I equate the first breath of a baby with the blossoming oak. I see this as our interdependence with trees. We need oxygen and trees transform carbon dioxide through photosynthesis to produce oxygen.






A Moving Stillness (Collection)


BY TARA LEAVER










During the first lockdown here in the UK, we were only allowed to go as far as we could walk for our one hour of daily exercise. I started visiting the rock pools on the beach below my house, and became obsessed with their layered and light filled depths. I made a collection of paintings about them, called A Moving Stillness. Painting my experience of them was a way to express and share both my ever deepening love of the local natural environment, and, during a time of great fear and anxiety, the peaceful, meditative energy they provided.





Ocean Totems


BY ALICE GARIK










I experience sanctuary during long walks at the ocean's edge, especially during this time of lockdown. Feeling wave upon wave wash over the sand moves me into the experience of the cyclic and expansive motion of the ocean. Finding remnants of sea life washed ashore has become the means to express, through these particular forms, the vastness and materiality of the ocean.

I place these fragments of sea life directly into my enlarger to make camera-less 16X20 inch negatives to contact print with palladium solution under the direct rays of the sun.

These are a few of the series I call Ocean Totems.






Unmade


BY KRISTINA SHEUFELT










Throughout lockdown, solitary excursions in urban nature have been my main source of mental stability. When a several weeks long period of rough weather this winter kept me inside, I found myself turning to landscapes manufactured or preserved through photography, primarily in magazine cuttings. During this time confined to the house, the landscape of the domestic interior began to feel just as surreal as the distant mountainscapes I cut from old National Geographic magazines. In this piece, an unmade bed makes up one of a series of distorted, out-of scale mountain ranges, speaking to the inflated severity of the mundane one experiences in isolation.










NOTE        NATURE AS A SPACE OR      CHANNEL FOR / IN CARE. CARE OF /    THROUGH      NATURE.  HOW PERIODS OF LOCKDOWN DIVERTED AND FOCUSED ATTENTION ON TEXTURES AND RHYTHMS     AND HUMANITY   IN NATURE, ESPECIALLY THOSE THAT HAD PREVIOUSLY      GONE UNNOTICED. 

CONTRIBUTORS EMERALD LIU,  KRISTINA SHEUFELT,        BRENNA TUEL,  HELEN BOOTH, SARAH PEDLOW,     MARYNA SHTANKO, LAURA MYCHAL,   ALICE GARIK,     TARA LEAVER

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED BY ARTISTS. TO PURCHASE WORKS CONTACT THE RESPECTIVE ARTISTS.

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